Introducing: Heft

This week we introduce a new brand into the ranks with Heft, a small T-shirt label based way down south in Eastbourne. The brand’s debut release consists of three pocket T-shirts, each utilising a different fabric.

Two camo prints, and a third paying homage to ice hockey make up the line, and each encorporates a 1 inch logo pin badge as it’s form of branding and a nice little touch. The heather grey ‘Son of the Bear’ if my favourite of the pack – I really like the flip on traditional camo prints, with a new kind of bear-shaped DPM.

It’s a modest start from the brand, and I’m looking forward to seeing more. If you want to grab one for yourself, they’re available from Heft Clothing now.

Adam Scotland

One of the three founding members of THE DAILY STREET, Adam is our Editor at TDS. Adam works in the streetwear industry for Out Of Step Ltd., specialising in both USA and UK brands. He also contributes to The Hundreds website.

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Comments

  • D-Money

    A new brand, first thing they do is drop a pocket t. With a moody little badge on it. Yawn.

  • mellowhype

    Probably should have done some market research before dropping a garment which everyone is clearly getting bored with… On top of that the tees arent even that interesting… looks like a children’s top you buy in gap or something.

  • Alex

    The badge is miserable. Cheap ass way of branding. Cheap horrible samey looking material.

    Primark are using pockets on every single tee they produce. When a store of that lameness starts using pockets on everything you know you need to just leave it alone and let it die.

  • dbone

    Boring and completely played out, but at least these look like they’re made out of fairly high quality materials, which is more than can be said about most of the other attempts that UK brands have had at this..

  • kyle

    why even feature this on here ?

  • Alex

    Kyle is spot on. This is a waste of a feature and frankly I understand if you used this as an example on the overuse of trends in the current UK apparel scene but no, to highlight this company and these products is just pointless. So much better and more innovative stuff out there.

  • Kritic

    3 tees and a shoddy site = you can be classed as a ‘brand’

  • http://www.someonetalked.net deadmowgli

    The problem with releasing a set of three non-descript pocket tees to establish your brand is that it really doesn’t do anything to separate you out from the dozens of other brands out there doing it, to varying degrees of success, style and execution. These are a bit weak in my opinion, i just don’t like the shape of the pockets nor their positioning. Miss.

  • Cal

    The sole aim of these tees is aimed at a very specific group of people. Its important to review and revise your target audience before going ahead and creating this type of garment. Pocket tees in my opinion and many others peoples opinion has been done, the brand needs to realise this and come back with a new direction if they are to succeed in my opinion.

  • REALTALK

    Complete, disastrous and truly epic fail. Next please.

  • Alex

    Also the website is HORRIFIC.

  • a

    how does the daily street decide what brands to feature and write about? some brands get decent reviews with half assed stuff. and others with decent stuff either never make it on here or get a so so review.

  • D-Money

    if you say things like “epic fail” you should probably buy one of these shirts.

  • john fish bar

    HEFT….HUF??

  • Geoff

    It’s a UK brand, hence worthy of inclusion and it’s hardly a long piece, just highlighting it’s launch. That’s one of TDS strengths, showing UK-made brands. Sure it’s hit and miss (and IMO this is a miss) but i’d rather that than a post about a limited edition Merc SLR that none of the site readers either a) have a shot at getting or b) could afford…leave that BS to Hypebeast and the other generic sites

  • BOBBO

    3 t-shirt’s as a first release, this can not be classed as a ‘brand’ without even discussing the actual literal lack of branding involved in such a fail of an attempt at a start up project.